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Monday, September 04, 2006

Straight Talk About Back Care - Program List

Straight Talk About Back Care

Topic: Back Injury Prevention

Audience: Nursing Home Staff

Setting: Worksite

Objectives:

1. Identify five of the most common activities within a nursing home which result in
back injuries according to the Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and
Health Administration, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and
Health.

2. Demonstrate at least two stretching and strengthening exercises designed to reduce the
risk of back injury as shown in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and
Health video.

3. Construct a personal back injury risk profile by completing the National Institute
for Occupational Safety and Health Activity Manual and Applications Manual.

4. Calculate the risk load for the top three identified risk behaviors using the Utah
Simplified Back Compression Force Model.

5. Discuss the one major advantage and the one major disadvantage of wearing a back
belt according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National
Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

Introduction

According to 1994 Bureau of Labor Statistics data, nursing home workers face the third highest rate of occupational injuries and illness among all U.S. industries with approximately 221,000 cases in 1994 alone. More than half of nursing home injuries and illnesses are related to handling residents, with an industry average of more than $8,400 each in workers’ compensation costs for each back injury.

The nursing home industry is one of the fastest growing industries in the U.S. with growth expected to continue beyond the next decade. This growth is expected to result in escalating cost to both residents and taxpayers in the form of Medicaid reimbursement for higher operation expenses. Education, training, and prevention initiatives have proven successful in reducing the incidence and severity of back injuries. Increased awareness of high risk activities is a key element to preventing back injuries among nursing home staff. The purpose of this lesson is to introduce daily work related activities most commonly associated with back injuries in nursing homes and provide a foundation for future lessons.
Content

A. Who is affected?
1. The injured worker
a. In 1993 17 out of every 100 nursing home workers lost work due to on
the job injury/illness.
2. Other staff
a. Unwanted overtime or changed work hours
b. High turnover rates
3. The residents
a. Loss of continuity
b. Inexperienced workers
4. The company
a. High Workers Compensation premiums
b. Retraining cost
5. Taxpayers
a. Medicare reimbursement

B. Where do injuries occur?
1. Anatomy of a nursing home
2. Navigating for safety
a. Awareness of self and purpose in the area
b. Awareness of residents in the area
c. Awareness of other staff and purpose in the area
d. Awareness of equipment and supplies associated with the area

D. Stressful Body Movements
1. Lifting
2. Twisting
3. Bending
4. Reaching
5. Holding
6. Carrying
7. Turning
8. Combinations of the above

E. Prevention Techniques
1. Awareness first: Ask yourself...
a. Can I use mechanical equipment to do this?
b. Can I work with another staff member to do this?
c. Is this the proper posture and position?




Teaching-Learning Activity

1. Introduce the topic of back injury and back injury prevention using the content outline
on previous pages. Using the transparency provided, emphasize that back injuries affect
everyone (Appendix A) and can occur throughout the nursing home: “Anatomy of a
Nursing Home (Appendix B). Distribute a copy of “Anatomy of a Nursing Home
(Appendix C) to each participant. Facilitate interaction by asking participants in what
area they work and discuss possible hazards encountered in each area. [15-20 minutes]

2. Distribute pencils and the “Job Task Risk Factors” and “Body Movement Risk Factor”
check lists (Appendix D and E respectively). Instruct each participant to complete
the questionnaire individually. No grade will be assigned. This is for their own use.
[15-20 minutes]

3. Use the “Job Task Risk Factors” and “Body Movement Risk Factors” check lists to
discuss stressful body movements which result in back injuries and the corresponding
prevention technique. As the list of stressful body movements is explored, ask
participants to identify (by raising their hand) which activities they recorded on the
check lists. [20-25 minutes]

4. Reinforce the need for “Awareness First” by using the transparency provided
(Appendix F) and emphasizing not only self awareness but awareness of other staff
and residents as well as environmental hazards.

5. Culminate by entertaining any questions participants may have in regard to identifying
activities associated with back injuries within a nursing home. Inform participants the
next lesson will consist of stretching and strengthening exercises therefore
comfortable clothing should be worn. [5-10 minutes]

Evaluation Opportunities

1. Participants will correctly identify five of seven provided common activities within a
nursing home which result in back injuries according to the Department of Labor,
Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and the National Institute for
Occupational Safety and Health by choosing the job task risk factor and/or body
movement risk factor associated with each picture. (Appendix G)

2. Participants will physically demonstrate the correct equipment, technique, or body
movement used to reduce the risk of back injury identified in the pictures from
Appendix G.





Materials and Resources

· Transparencies (See Appendix A, B, and F)
· Handouts (See Appendix See Appendix C, D, and E)
· Back Injury Prevention Identification Examination (Total need based on attendance; See Appendix G)
· Pencils

Bibliography

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), DHHS, (1995).
Back Facts Activity Manual. (pg. 31-32).

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Anatomy of a Nursing Home. [On-line document]. Available http://www.osha_sle.gov

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). OSHA Technical Manual. [On-line document]. Available: http://www.osha_sle.gov

US Dept. Of Labor (USDOL). (1996). Characteristics of Injuries and Illnesses Resulting In Absences From Work, 1994. USDOL-96-163.

US Dept. Of Labor (USDOL). Searchable Database. Available: http://www.dol.gov

Worksafe Western Australia. (1996). [On-line gif. files]. Available: http://www.wt.com.au/saftetyline/d_pubs/nursing/nurs_ind.htm

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